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DIY Roof Repair: How to Fix Asphalt Roofing, 20 Mar 2015
20 Mar 2015

Minneapolis roofing is a very touchy thing, especially following the winter. But on the first day of spring, when the snow and ice begin to thaw and the sun at last starts to shine down on the world, residents all over the Twin Cities are going to their roofs to determine if there is any damage. As we have explained before, different shingle types gain different kinds of injuries over different periods of time.

No other shingle material is as common and widely used as asphalt. Though these shingles only last for thirty years (and sometimes even less in harsh conditions like this), the majority of DIY roof repair techniques deal specifically in addressing these shortcomings. So while you may have a leaky roof following this dreadful winter, there are actually many ways you deal with these problems before your home sustains too much interior damage.

Dealing with Curled Corners

The most common injury you will find on an asphalt shingle is a case of curled corners. This affliction is dominantly associated with age, however in the case of Minneapolis roofing, it can also be the result of ice dams forming on the roof. Curled corners lead directly to leaks on interior ceilings, making them a problem that must be addressed as soon as it’s discovered.

Fortunately, the cure is really quite simple. Once the snow and ice have thawed and you’re able to get onto the roof safely, check your corners carefully for either upward or downward curls. If you catch them early enough—and if you’re vigilant about your roof maintenance during the winter, you should—all you have to do is apply a dab of roofing sealant with a caulk gun and weigh it down with a brick. If it remains untouched for a day, you will find that corner secure as the day it was installed.

Repairing Cracks

Cracked shingles are another big problem. However, they also have a pretty easy DIY roof repair solution. Just like with the curled corner, apply a thick bead of roofing sealant just under the lip of the crack. Then press the shingle down and apply a thicker bead of sealant on the crack directly. If you have jagged edges, be sure to cover them with a putty knife. Also don’t forget to make sure some spare granules are applied in the surface of the sealant so you can more easily camouflage the repair.

Count on Coty

Both of these common asphalt problems with Minneapolis roofing are quite easy to pull off and only require a few cheap materials to fully do. So remember that although asphalt may be cheap and has a reputation for not living very long, all sorts of tricks are available to help you prolong its lifespan. Be sure to contact us or check our e-book if you have any other questions about DIY roof repair.

Minneapolis and St. Paul Construction: What Are the Differences?, 18 Mar 2015
18 Mar 2015

Though folks nationwide call Minneapolis and St. Paul the “Twin Cities,” they really couldn’t be further apart than they are. There are some definite differences between these two places both in attitude and architecture. So when you are a part of the Minneapolis construction industry like we are, it would behoove us to be familiar with these differences. But the common layman, in all likelihood, is not familiar at all. So let’s go over the building character of these two related cities and see what makes each one unique in its own way.

St. Paul

As the state capital of Minnesota, St. Paul has been around for a long time. The city is widely known not so much for modern style or convenience, but on more archaic ways of building which give the city a much older character. As a result, St. Paul construction needs to be focused more on maintaining the same level of sophistication that older styles are known for. In this sense, the grander the exterior, the better off you’ll be.

But at the same time, St. Paul construction needs to be done in such a way to maintain the same aura, as it were, of classicism without looking like a cheap reproduction. This can be accomplished in a number of ways, such as using period-accurate materials like wood shingles and siding, and more open interior floor plans with a focus on larger rooms. Stone can be used to tremendous effect as well for exterior walls as well as fences and property boundaries.

Minneapolis

Minneapolis construction, on the other hand, is an entirely approach. Minneapolis is a city which emphasizes bold architectural choices across a wider space of time. Modern styles can be applied to new buildings in this city, in keeping with the artistic vibe Minneapolis possesses. Whatever your opinion is on modern architecture, it does lend a unique feeling to the city.

But there is one other thing which distinguishes Minneapolis from its twin. Minneapolis possesses a plethora of “prairie homes,” which are known for being single-story homes with wide open living areas and smaller secondary rooms like bathrooms and bedrooms. Prairie homes were invented in Minneapolis by Frank Lloyd Wright, who built two homes in this distinct style. So if modern eccentricity isn’t quite your spiel, quaintness and simplicity can fit in Minneapolis construction as well.

Count on Coty

However you decide to build your custom home in Minneapolis or St. Paul, we will be there to help you out. Coty Construction is familiar with all the different building techniques you expect from a contractor as well as all the different materials which goes into making the home of your dreams. Be sure to contact us to find out how we can help you.

Minneapolis Roofing and Recycling Materials, 16 Mar 2015
16 Mar 2015

When we were in the process of doing research about eco-friendly building techniques, we found a number of different articles that talked about how Minneapolis roofing materials can be used in other things. For a long time, we were dominantly concerned about how recyclable materials can be used towards roofing but not so much how roofing can be used toward other things. This was when we realized that there is a lot more which can be done with shingles than just covering your head, that recycling is a two way process. So let’s look at some of the ways your old roofing can be used toward other things.

From Your Roof to the Road

Asphalt roofing is possibly the worst of the different varieties we have covered here. It doesn’t last as long. It punctures easily. It is fairly difficult to install. But one thing we learned is that asphalt roofing is actually quite recyclable. While Minneapolis roofing cannot benefit greatly from the material, Minneapolis roads can. Used asphalt shingles have been taken advantage of for years to provide a foundation for roads. Even before recycling became cool, contractors purchased wasted shingles, melted them down, and created cement from what’s left, building roads and repairing potholes.

Save Those Damaged Shingles

Wood is a material we have cited time and again for being one of the most environmentally friendly shingle types on the market right now. It takes advantage of a renewable resource. It repels moisture effectively. It is, all in all, a great material to use. But have you ever wondered what to do with that old shingle after you use it? The answer is quite simple: burn it in the furnace. Wood furnaces have grown in popularity lately because of their ability to heat a home during the winter more effectively than central heating can using a material you can just harvest year after year.

Check Out the Hybrids

The production of shingles has also taken advantage of recycling techniques. Believe it or not, there is actually another type of shingle we have not covered yet. Called “hybrid shingles,” these Minneapolis roofing monstrosities are causing quite a stir among contractors everywhere. Utilizing old waste such as plastic and paper, shingle companies are actually producing shingles made completely out of recycled waste. These hybrid shingles are purported to last just as long as wood shingles, longer than asphalt, and can be continuously experimented with to produce stronger, cheaper varieties.

Count on Coty

Recycled materials benefit everybody in the short term and the long term. They cut costs and prevent waste from building up in the local landfills. If you want to learn more about eco-friendly Minneapolis roofing, be sure to contact Coty for more information. We will be more than happy to answer all of your questions.

How to Repair Vinyl Siding, 13 Mar 2015
13 Mar 2015

DIY home repair is one of the most popular methods of improving or maintaining your house. Very few people truly enjoy having to call a contractor for every little mishap that could happen around the home, so it makes sense why at least one member of the family should have a handyman of some sort. Even for mundane tasks like repairing siding or replacing a shingle, it’s quite nice to have one around.

The fact of the matter, though, is that DIY home repair is not as difficult as you might think. Sure, some home maintenance projects might require some outside help, but for the most part anybody with some steady hands and good set of eyes can fix issues with the home. This is especially the case with vinyl siding, which is quite easy to repair even if it is unappealing to look at. So here is the definitive guide to helping you repair your vinyl siding.

The Tools of the Trade

Before you even start DIY home repair on your exterior wall, you are going to need a few things to help you work. You will need adhesive caulking to secure the piece and wood shims to close it up. You will also need a zip tool, tin snips, and a standard table saw. We also recommend that you keep a spare panel or two around from initial installation to give you pieces to perform the patchwork.

Step One: Remove the Old Piece

The first thing you want to do is use the zip tool to unlock the panel from its neighbors. If you start at the bottom edge, you will find your job goes a lot easier. Once the edge you are working on is loose, insert a wood shim to keep the older panels in place. Then use the snips to cut the damaged area out. Use the wood saw to cut a piece of good vinyl out. Of course, you need to make sure that the replacement piece is just slightly longer than the damaged piece so you can just tuck it nicely under the good sections.

Step Two: Replace

When you are ready to apply the replacement piece, use a thin bead of adhesive caulk along the back side. Remove the wood shims and slide it underneath the pre-existing piece. Once you have it in line, press down and lock it into place.

And that’s how you fix vinyl siding. This particular DIY home repair method is fantastic if your wall has suffered burns or water damage as a result of a bad gutter. However, it does have its disadvantages, such as your siding looking worse than it already is.

Count on Coty

So you may want to use this accident as an excuse to get some better siding for your house. We know all about different kinds of materials and how to properly install them. Be sure to contact us if you ever have any questions.